Many failures of engineering structures result from fracture and fatigue problems. It is estimated that in The USA more than 100 billion dollars are lost every year to fracture and fatigue problems. This number is likely multiplied many times over on a worldwide scale. Since the development of quantitative approaches to fracture and fatigue in the mid 1900’s, an estimated 50 percent of these failures could have been prevented by the proper application of technology. Many industries fail to use these proven approaches due to lack of knowledge or inadequate funding to implement the latest technology. Use of these technologies can improve the design life of structures by an implementation of fail-safe, safe-life or fracture-proof designs. It is important that engineers involved with structural design, material selection and failure prevention and analysis have a working knowledge of fracture and fatigue fundamentals and methods of failure prevention. This knowledge could come from a better understanding of fracture mechanics and fatigue concepts and a knowledge of methods for applying these to engineering structures. Since the development of fracture and fatigue concepts in the middle 1900’s, many test standards have been developed and many methods for application of these techniques are available.

This proposed mini-course would present the basic concepts of engineering fracture mechanics and fatigue. In addition test methods used for determining properties used in a fracture and fatigue and fatigue analysis would be presented. Finally methods of applying the technology to the prevention of fracture and fatigue failures will be presented. Some case studies showing how this technology has been used in the past used would also be presented. The course would start with the traditional linear-elastic approach to fracture mechanics. After the linear-elastic concepts are fully covered, the newer nonlinear approaches to fracture mechanics would be covered.

The course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of fracture and fatigue concepts. However, the student should have a good background in basic stress analysis, engineering mathematics and a working knowledge of engineering materials. The course would be suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and engineers from industry. The course would involve some student participation with workshop sessions for solving practical problems in fracture and fatigue. The course will also provide an opportunity for students to bring to class problems for discussion.

For the workshop sessions in the course, students need to bring a basic calculator (with arithmetic functions square, square root and maybe trigonometric functions if available). They would not need a computer or software. Scientific calculator with plotting facility can be a plus, but it is not necessary.


Course Objectives
  • Learn the importance of using a fracture mechanics approach.
  • Understand basic principles of the fracture mechanics approach.
  • Learn testing methods and data analysis techniques.
  • Learn basic approaches to fatigue analysis and testing.
  • Learn methods for applying this technology to prevent structural failures.

Tentative Schedule of Classes

The date/time in the schedule below are fixed. Topics/content/order of presentation may change marginally depending on the audience.

Date/Time Topic
7/11/2016
0900-0930
Inauguration by the Vice Chancellor, followed by tea and snacks
7/11/2016
1400-1500
Fracture mechanics background and analytical tools
7/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 1: Determining fracture mechanics parameters
8/11/2016
1400-1500
Fracture toughness testing
8/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 2: Fracture toughness data and properties
9/11/2016
1400-1500
Fatigue concepts, testing and properties
9/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 3: Analysis of fracture and fatigue data
10/11/2016
1400-1500
Environmental effects in fracture and fatigue
10/11/2016
1530-1630
Fracture mechanics applications
10/11/2016
1630-1730
Tutorial cum assisted self-study and discussion session
11/11/2016
1400-1500
Workshop 4: Fracture and fatigue analysis of engineering structures
11/11/2016
1530-1630
Case studies in fracture and fatigue
14/11/2016 Public Holiday: No Classes
15/11/2016
1400-1500
Nonlinear fracture mechanics parameters
15/11/2016
1515-1615
Nonlinear fracture and fatigue testing
15/11/2016
1630-1730
Workshop 5: Analyzing nonlinear fracture mechanics test results
16/11/2016
1400-1500
Transition fracture toughness and analysis
16/11/2016
1515-1615
Nonlinear fracture mechanics applications
16/11/2016
1630-1730
Workshop 6: Using nonlinear fracture mechanics applications
17/11/2016
1400-1500
Standard updates, sortware and new trends
17/11/2016
1515-1615
New trends in research
17/11/2016
1630-1800
Examination/Assessment/Evaluation. Venue: Kelkar Laboratory, Centre for Modeling and Simulation, SPPU
18/11/2016
1100-1200
Concluding session
18/11/2016
1200-1300
Workshop 7: Discussion of exam problems, and any problems contributed by students. Venue: Kelkar Laboratory, Centre for Modeling and Simulation, SPPU
john_d_landes-brochure.pdfjohn_d_landes-brochure.pdf