Global Initiative of Academic Networks (GIAN) Courses @ CMS-SPPU



GIAN@CMS-SPPU Participants -- Nov 7-18, 2016



Feedback from GIAN visiting faculty
I would like to express my most sincere and heartfelt thanks for all the effort and work you put toward making my recent trip to Pune University to participate in the GIAN courses such a wonderful experience. Everything from the hotel stay to the transportation and meals was so carefully arranged, that not once did I worry about any of the logistics of my stay. The accommodations were fabulous, and the experience that I had in India was amazing and quite memorable.

During my trip, I especially enjoyed teaching and interacting with students and faculty. I hope that I will retain many of the professional and academic relationships that were built during these interactions, as I was greatly impressed by the hospitality and kindness as well as the high academic quality of the students, faculty, and research. I was also pleased that my course material, which included topics that I am quite passionate about in my own research, was so well received.

Additionally, I had a chance to meet with faculty from the Centre for Modeling and Simulation and learned quite a bit about the Centre and the types of projects that are focused on there. I was impressed to hear that this Centre was started in the early 2000s, when such places were still rare even in the U.S., and to see the advanced computing techniques and multi-disciplinary projects that take place there. I hope that this Centre continues to thrive and that I may be able to visit it again some day.

Please do keep in touch with me, and I have encouraged the students in my course to do the same. I hope that we will have many opportunities to meet again in the future.

Rebecca McNamee
We found that everything was in order for our starting the course thanks to the hard work of Mihir Arjunwadkar, Bhalchandra Pujari, their team at the Centre for Modeling and Simulation, GIAN coordinator Saroj Ghaskadbi, and perhaps many other people who worked in the background incognito. The success of this project was a result of their efforts which were considerable and were appreciated very much by us.

John D. Landes


Course details, brochure, class schedule, etc.
The courses below will run between November 7-18, 2016, Mon-Fri (except November 14). See detailed information on individual courses below.
Venue
Department of Management Science (PUMBA) Auditorium, Savitribai Phule Pune University | Google map
Registration and fees at the GIAN end
  1. GIAN One-time registration is a must. There is a fee of ₹500 for this. If you face any technical problems with registration at this site, please contact their support via gian[at]iitkgp.ac.in and gianregn[at]iitkgp.ac.in (with Cc to gian[at]cms.unipune.ac.in).
  2. After successful registration, please send an email to gian[at]cms.unipune.ac.in, and tell us which of the courses below have you registered for.
Fees at the SPPU end
  • People affiliated to SP Pune University or affiliated colleges: No fee; please provide some proof of affiliation.
  • People affiliated to academic institutions, research institutes, NGOs, etc.: ₹1000.
  • People from industry: ₹5000.
Course fees as applicable are to be paid by demand draft drawn in the name of "Finance and Accounts Officer, SPPU, Pune 411007", payable at Pune, to be submitted on the first day of the course.
Travel and accommodation
Unfortunately, we are not in a position to pay for travel costs or arrange accommodation (off- or on-campus) for course participants. Out-station candidates need to arrange for transport and accommodation on their own.
Certificates
Full attendance necessary to be eligible for certificate of participation/attendance. Appearing for evaluation/examination during the course is necessary for certificate of grades in the course.
Contact @ CMS
Centre's phone lines are dead for months thanks to on-going construction work. Please get in touch with us via email to gian[at]cms.unipune.ac.in. We appreciate your patience.
Special Course Requirements
For the workshop sessions in the course Fracture and Fatigue of Engineering Materials, students need to bring a basic calculator (with arithmetic functions square, square root and maybe trigonometric functions if available). They would not need a computer or software. Scientific calculator with plotting facility can be a plus, but it is not necessary.
Live Webcast
GIAN@SPPUSPPU@YouTube

The brain is perhaps the most fascinating of all organs in the human body, as it is the foundation of human thought and behavior. Despite the explosion of brain research that has occurred over the past several years, the brain remains mysterious with many unknowns. Moreover, with the 12 month prevalence of mental illness being about 1 in 5 adults worldwide and 29.2% across lifetime (Steel et al., 2014), a better understanding of this system would likely lead to better methods of support and treatment for this population.

Throughout history the ability to study the brain has been limited due to lack of technology. Over the past two decades however, a technique called functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has led to the ability to study a living brain non-invasively and thus has become extremely popular among researchers. As fMRI requires some knowledge of physics, neuroscience, psychology, and statistics, it is an area which typically requires interdisciplinary teams to work together to fully understand the methods and to make proper inferences about the results. Furthermore, while it has advanced our understanding of the brain, its limitations and potential methods to overcome or minimize these limitations should also be considered.

This course offers a detailed introduction to fMRI, starting with an overview of neuroscience and neuroanatomy and advancing to the functionality of the brain. Initially, a brief history of past and current techniques to study this functionality will be described, leading into a detailed introduction to MRI and fMRI.

The second half of the course focuses on the theory and application of both MRI and fMRI. Principles of magnetic resonance and their application to imaging are covered, as well as how MRI progressed from a measure of structure to a measure of function. Practical applications, such as design of experiments, preprocessing, and analysis of data as well as limitations of these methods are also covered.

Finally, the course offers an overview of how fMRI is used to study functional connectivity in the brain, and a brief introduction to diffusion tensor imaging, which is applied to study white matter tracks in the brain, is given. The final two lectures will be spent on current applications of fMRI to study cutting edge topics such as the processing of emotions, learning and memory, fear learning and extinction, and the effects of sleep.

The course is designed for students with little or no background in neuroscience and imaging, although a basic background in biology and physics is highly preferred. Thus, the course is suitable for undergraduate students, graduate students, and other professionals with an interest in the brain.


Course Objectives
  • Develop a basic understanding of the brain and the nervous system.
  • Learn about the types of functional neuroimaging and their limitations.
  • Gain an understanding of MRI and fMRI and their potential uses.
  • Develop an understanding of the challenges and limitations of fMRI.
  • Explore some current applications of fMRI in neuroimaging research.

Tentative Schedule of Classes

The date/time in the schedule below are fixed. Topics/content/order of presentation may change marginally depending on the audience.

Date/Time Topic
7/11/2016
0900-0930
Inauguration by the Vice Chancellor, followed by tea and snacks.
7/11/2016
1000-1100
Brief Introduction to neuroscience: Broad overview of the field including its origins to main topics in research today.
7/11/2016
1115-1215
The nervous system, anatomy and physiology at the cellular level, cell types, communication between cells and how they work together to contribute to the functioning of the brain as a whole.
8/11/2016
0930-1030
Overall anatomy of the brain, the architecture of the different lobes, the layers of the cerebral cortex, terminology used to describe and study different regions.
8/11/2016
1100-1200
Mapping function to structure: Functional organization of the brain, how different regions specialize and work together to control our behavior (emotions, executive functioning, etc.).
9/11/2016
0930-1030
Introduction to anatomical and functional imaging, how the methods have progressed our understanding of the brain.
9/11/2016
1100-1200
Overview of the types of neuroimaging: Direct measures of neural activity (Evoked potentials, EEG, MEG); indirect measures of neural activity (PET imaging, functional MRI).
10/11/2016
0930-1030
Magnetic Resonance Imaging: History, advantages to research, basic principles of magnetic resonance.
10/11/2016
1100-1200
MRI continued: Acquisition of MR images - parameters in MRI, spin density, contrasts, spatial orientation, imaging other elements besides hydrogen.
10/11/2016
1200-1300
Tutorial cum assisted self-study and discussion session.
11/11/2016
0930-1030
Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: How it works, the BOLD signal, what is measured and the information it offers.
11/11/2016
1100-1200
fMRI in Practice: Design of experiments, raw data, preprocessing the data, first and second level analysis.
14/11/2016 Public Holiday: No Classes
15/11/2016
0930-1030
Statistical problems of fMRI: Sources of variability that negatively affect the experiment (motion, physiological noise, field distortions) and how to control for/minimize these.
15/11/2016
1045-1145
Modeling the fMRI data: The general linear model for individual analysis, techniques to combine groups of subjects and problems of multiple comparisons.
15/11/2016
1200-1300
Mini-lab session: Students design their own fMRI study, discussion.
16/11/2016
0930-1030
MRI/fMRI Safety: Risks of MRI and safety precautions.
16/11/2016
1045-1145
fMRI to study functional connectivity and "resting state" fMRI.
16/11/2016
1200-1300
Diffusion Tensor Imaging – an MRI method to study white matter tracks.
17/11/2016
0930-1030
Specific application of fMRI: Emotion processing, learning and memory.
17/11/2016
1045-1145
Specific applications of fMRI continued: PTSD, Fear learning and extinction, and the effects of sleep.
17/11/2016
1200-1330
Examination/Assessment/Evaluation. Venue: Kelkar Laboratory, Centre for Modeling and Simulation, SPPU
18/11/2016
0930-1030
Specific applications of fMRI continued: Potential clinical application followed by overview discussion of the course, interactive question-and-answer session, discussion of exam problems, etc..
18/11/2016
1100-1200
Concluding session.
rebecca_l_mcnamee-brochure.pdfrebecca_l_mcnamee-brochure.pdf

Many failures of engineering structures result from fracture and fatigue problems. It is estimated that in The USA more than 100 billion dollars are lost every year to fracture and fatigue problems. This number is likely multiplied many times over on a worldwide scale. Since the development of quantitative approaches to fracture and fatigue in the mid 1900’s, an estimated 50 percent of these failures could have been prevented by the proper application of technology. Many industries fail to use these proven approaches due to lack of knowledge or inadequate funding to implement the latest technology. Use of these technologies can improve the design life of structures by an implementation of fail-safe, safe-life or fracture-proof designs. It is important that engineers involved with structural design, material selection and failure prevention and analysis have a working knowledge of fracture and fatigue fundamentals and methods of failure prevention. This knowledge could come from a better understanding of fracture mechanics and fatigue concepts and a knowledge of methods for applying these to engineering structures. Since the development of fracture and fatigue concepts in the middle 1900’s, many test standards have been developed and many methods for application of these techniques are available.

This proposed mini-course would present the basic concepts of engineering fracture mechanics and fatigue. In addition test methods used for determining properties used in a fracture and fatigue and fatigue analysis would be presented. Finally methods of applying the technology to the prevention of fracture and fatigue failures will be presented. Some case studies showing how this technology has been used in the past used would also be presented. The course would start with the traditional linear-elastic approach to fracture mechanics. After the linear-elastic concepts are fully covered, the newer nonlinear approaches to fracture mechanics would be covered.

The course is designed for students who have little or no knowledge of fracture and fatigue concepts. However, the student should have a good background in basic stress analysis, engineering mathematics and a working knowledge of engineering materials. The course would be suitable for advanced undergraduate students, graduate students and engineers from industry. The course would involve some student participation with workshop sessions for solving practical problems in fracture and fatigue. The course will also provide an opportunity for students to bring to class problems for discussion.

For the workshop sessions in the course, students need to bring a basic calculator (with arithmetic functions square, square root and maybe trigonometric functions if available). They would not need a computer or software. Scientific calculator with plotting facility can be a plus, but it is not necessary.


Course Objectives
  • Learn the importance of using a fracture mechanics approach.
  • Understand basic principles of the fracture mechanics approach.
  • Learn testing methods and data analysis techniques.
  • Learn basic approaches to fatigue analysis and testing.
  • Learn methods for applying this technology to prevent structural failures.

Tentative Schedule of Classes

The date/time in the schedule below are fixed. Topics/content/order of presentation may change marginally depending on the audience.

Date/Time Topic
7/11/2016
0900-0930
Inauguration by the Vice Chancellor, followed by tea and snacks
7/11/2016
1400-1500
Fracture mechanics background and analytical tools
7/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 1: Determining fracture mechanics parameters
8/11/2016
1400-1500
Fracture toughness testing
8/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 2: Fracture toughness data and properties
9/11/2016
1400-1500
Fatigue concepts, testing and properties
9/11/2016
1530-1630
Workshop 3: Analysis of fracture and fatigue data
10/11/2016
1400-1500
Environmental effects in fracture and fatigue
10/11/2016
1530-1630
Fracture mechanics applications
10/11/2016
1630-1730
Tutorial cum assisted self-study and discussion session
11/11/2016
1400-1500
Workshop 4: Fracture and fatigue analysis of engineering structures
11/11/2016
1530-1630
Case studies in fracture and fatigue
14/11/2016 Public Holiday: No Classes
15/11/2016
1400-1500
Nonlinear fracture mechanics parameters
15/11/2016
1515-1615
Nonlinear fracture and fatigue testing
15/11/2016
1630-1730
Workshop 5: Analyzing nonlinear fracture mechanics test results
16/11/2016
1400-1500
Transition fracture toughness and analysis
16/11/2016
1515-1615
Nonlinear fracture mechanics applications
16/11/2016
1630-1730
Workshop 6: Using nonlinear fracture mechanics applications
17/11/2016
1400-1500
Standard updates, sortware and new trends
17/11/2016
1515-1615
New trends in research
17/11/2016
1630-1800
Examination/Assessment/Evaluation. Venue: Kelkar Laboratory, Centre for Modeling and Simulation, SPPU
18/11/2016
1100-1200
Concluding session
18/11/2016
1200-1300
Workshop 7: Discussion of exam problems, and any problems contributed by students. Venue: Kelkar Laboratory, Centre for Modeling and Simulation, SPPU
john_d_landes-brochure.pdfjohn_d_landes-brochure.pdf